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Tags >> Interesting Tidbits
Jun 16
2014

How to Write a Book Review -- Teen Summer Reading

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

Teen readers grades 7-12 can enter our book review contest as part of our Annual Summer Reading Program, "Spark a Reaction," to win a Kindle FIRE!

But how to write a winning book review?

  1. Pick a book that interests you!
  2. Look for some examples of book reviews. Your favorite magazine may be a good source, or you can also find book reviews online at the Books section of The New York Times, the Powell’s Books Review a day, People Magazine, Booklist, Teenreads.com, Teenink.com, Good Reads, or Kirkus Reviews. The library will have some links up on their webpage for you.
  3. Pick out the main elements, which should include:
    • The book’s title and author
    • A brief summary of the plot that doesn’t give away too much
    • Comments on the book’s strengths and weaknesses
    • The reviewer’s personal response to the book with specific examples to support praise or criticism
    •  
  4. Take notes while reading the book you are reviewing, so you can remember what points you want to make later and what specific scenes or quotes you might want to use to support those points.
  5. Make an outline for the book review before writing, using one paragraph for each point you want to make about the book.
  6. Some ideas to keep in mind while writing the review:
    • Does the book fit into a genre, like mystery or romance, and why? If you aren’t sure, ask your librarian for help!
    • When and where does the action in the book take place? Does the author do a good job of making you feel like you are there? How?
    • Are the main characters believable? Do you know anyone like them? Does the author adequately describe them?
    • What do you like or dislike about the author’s writing style? That is, do you like the way the author uses words?
    • Use concrete examples to back up your points, such as describing a scene that really moved you or using a couple of short quotes from the book.
    • Don’t forget to include your opinion of the book, whether you liked or disliked it and WHY!
  7. Do some background research on the author. Sources might include the author’s personal website, the website for the book’s publisher, or biographies of the author. Learning information about the author and knowing what other books he or she may have written can add context to a review. Ask a librarian for help finding sources, if you can’t find any on your own.
  8. Don’t forget to ask for help! The librarians at the Dayton Library are here to help you!

For more information or to pick up an entry form, please talk to the librarians at the Dayton Library. :-)

May 29
2014

Get in Touch with Your Inner Music

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

 

Display by Heather

May 20
2014

This Year, My Library Helped Me....

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

"...do school in the morning."

"...find some very tasty vegan recipes!"

"...with my art -- recycled magazines! Thank you."

"...get a life."

"...yolo."

What can we help YOU with this year? Let us know in the comments, give us a call (382-4131), or drop us an email (library@daytonwa.net)!

Jan 31
2014

Oldest Books in Our Library Followup

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

I got an interesting response today from Sean Lanksbury (and forwarded by Jeff Martin) at our very own Washington State Library regarding that "Oldest Books in the Library" post I made back on January 10th. Sean writes:

History of Washington, The Evergreen State, from Early Dawn to Daylight is done in a grandiose and heroic style very common to late 19th century histories.  The Editor, Julian Hawthorne (1846 - 1934) was the only son of novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne and painter Sophia Peabody.  The work was the editor’s second work of Historical Non-Fiction, following The Story of Oregon: A History With Portraits and Biographies, (New York, NY: American Historical Publishing, 1892.)  Hawthorne was also known as a writer of gothically-styled Romantic Era novels, which were commercially successful but critically disdained for not following in his father’s footsteps.  His non-fiction editing fared better in critical circles.

Colonel George Douglas Brewerton was a poet, sketch artist and painter who during his military service was part of Kit Carson's 1848 expedition from Los Angeles, California to New Mexico. He gained some notoriety for publishing a three-part work on the trip in Harper's Weekly.   Brewerton came to Tacoma in the mid to late 1880s. WSL has a copy of a poem he wrote and recited memorializing the Grand Army of the Republic and fallen soldiers to a Tacoma crowd on Decoration Day (c/k/a Memorial Day) in 1889: 

http://stlow.iii.com/search~S1?/o69957550

Sources:

"George Douglas Brewerton: Painter, Historian, and Poet of the Far West," by Lewis O. Saum. The Pacific Northwest Quarterly, Vol. 94, No. 1 (Winter, 2002/2003), pp. 3-13)

"Julian Hawthorne." Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Literature Resource Center. Web. 31 Jan. 2014. 

Cheers,

Sean Lanksbury

So now we know more about these lovely old books in our collection. :-)

Jan 10
2014

The Oldest Books in Our Library

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

While doing research in our newspaper archive other day, I had a patron ask me what the oldest book in our library was.

I did a little sleuthing and this is what I came up with:

Two books, Pen Pictures from the Garden of the World: History of Oregon, Illustrated and History of Washington Volume 1, both with print dates in 1893.

The Pen Pictures book has a lovely, embossed leather cover.

Unfortunately, we don't know much about these two books, other than they are very old. Both have complete page counts, and are an interesting look into the history of the Pacific Northwest.

If you are interested in taking a gander at these old tomes, please inquire about the Genealogy Reference section at the front desk. :-)

Dec 04
2013

Get in the Christmas Mood with Some Christmas Books

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

Come check out our new display of Christmas books for the holiday season!



Nov 07
2013

Booking Meeting Spaces

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

As you may know, the library offers a lovely meeting space for private bookings called the Delany Room:

The Delany Room is available for non-commercial purposes simply by calling us to schedule a day, however, we are seeing so many bookings that we are now having to ask patrons to book the room at least three (3!) months in advance.

So what are some other options if you cannot schedule a day in Delany?

You can try:

  • The Youth Building or Pavilion at the Columbia County Fairgrounds (call Public Works at 382-2534)
  • The basement at Banner Bank (382-4714)
  • The Seneca Activity Center (382-8318)
  • The General Store (382-1042)
  • The conference room at Best Western (382-4790)
  • The conference room at the Port of Columbia (382-2577)

Please keep in mind these spaces may or may not be free, and are subject to the rules and policies of the managing entity.

Good luck!

Oct 09
2013

Spooky books for spooky weather

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

It's October once again and there's that distinctive chill in the air that says Autumn is here! It's an excellent time of year to hunker down with a cup of tea and a spooky read. We have lots!

Book display by Heather, featuring selections from our general collection, DVDs, Sci-Fi, children's books, teen, and non-fiction.

Aug 02
2013

WA-List Library Card Gallery

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

The WA-List website has done something very, very cool -- they've put together a mosaic map of the state of Washington using images of library cards from around the state.

http://www.wa-list.com/?p=418

"We contacted every public library in Washington and asked them to contribute a card (real or digital image) to our project.  The first card arrived within ten minutes... In the end we collected 99 cards from 49 different library systems... (FYI: There are 58 library systems in Washington that use cards and two that don’t.  Only nine libraries did not submit cards to the project.)"

And guess what? Our library card is on the map! :)

Apr 03
2013

Books "for Dummies" on a Wide Range of Topics!

Posted by heather in Interesting Tidbits

Did you know we have a HUGE selection of "Dummies" books? Topics ranging from computer help to animals, speaking a foreign language to coaching a football team. :)

(top shelf) iPod & iTunes for Dummies, Grant Writing for Dummies, QuickBooks 2011 for Dummies, Laptops for Seniors for Dummies, Kindle Fire for Dummies, Laptops for Dummies

(bottom shelf) Basic Math & Pre-Algebra for Dummies, Organic Chemistry I for Dummies, Weather for Dummies, Glycemic Index Cookbook for Dummies, Windows 8 for Dummies, Art History for Dummies

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